Tony Aardvark. Debunking commonly held myths

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    In a recent statement, Chris Huhne, an active voice for climate change, has likened the cause to fighting Adolf Hitler. It’s clear that this comparison is just another way to scare the masses into believing the climate change theory that Huhne and his cohorts are spreading.

     

    In addition to this comparison to Hitler, Huhne has also stated that climate change will make the likelihood of wars and civil unrest increase. Couple these statements with other ones made by Greenpeace regarding the state of the oceans and the United Nations trying to create a worldwide government through their Peacekeeping efforts in order to handle the unrest that climate change will supposedly bring about, and you get a fear-based society that will believe what they’re told out of panic. This is one of the most important tools that climate change activists are using to gain and maintain control. This was made clear during the Copenhagen COP15 where the opening video was a blatant fear mongering message that was meant to create terror instead of to inform people.

     

    In order to keep people on their side and to continue to maintain control of the conversation, these activists are pushing the fear element further and labelling their adversaries “deniers” as a way to demonize them further in the eyes of the people. This label is an obvious link to the terms used for people who deny the Holocaust which makes the jump to comparing the fight for climate change to fighting Hitler reasonable in their minds. One would think that this leap in logic would seem to undermine their scientific arguments, but clearly they think differently.

     

    World leaders who oppose a global agreement to tackle climate change are making a similar mistake to the one made by politicians who tried to appease Adolf Hitler before World War Two, a British government minister said on Thursday.

     

    Energy and Climate Change Minister Chris Huhne said governments must redouble efforts to find a successor to the United Nations Kyoto Protocol on emissions, although it was unlikely that a breakthrough would be made at a conference later this year in Durban in South Africa.

     

    The global economic crisis has pushed the search for a legally binding treaty to limit planet-warming emissions down the political agenda and countries do not want to lose their competitive edge by going it alone on strict climate targets, he said.

    In a speech urging countries to keep pressing for a climate deal, Huhne evoked the memory of British wartime leader Winston Churchill and the fight against Nazi Germany led by Hitler.

     

    “Climate change is getting less political attention now than it did two years ago. There is a vacuum, and the forces of low ambition are looking to fill it,” he said. “Giving in to the forces of low ambition would be an act of climate appeasement.”

     

    This is our Munich moment,”

     

    “Climate Appeasement.” Someone threw away quite a bit of money to come up with this gem.

     

    If you put Huhne’s statement about Climate Appeasement in perspective with Britain’s recorded CO2 output (2% of the actual worldwide aggregate) it is quite outlandish, which fits Chris Huhne well.

     

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    • post11

    [ Multitudes of abandoned wind turbines at South Point, Hawaii, USA. ]

    The United States is Littered With More than 14,000 Abandoned Wind Turbines

    Wind power, the renewable energy that will save the world from global warming, is actually an environmental disaster that is directly affecting the bird population in certain places and causing a nuisance to the people who live close to these monsters. They’re also causing environmental problems for countries like China who are manufacturing the turbines and are actually failing at producing reliable energy.

    In a previous post regarding the disrespectful placement of wind turbines on the D Day beaches of Normandy it was concluded that leftist propagandists would be up in arms if this are were home to a threatened species of bat: “Now if the area around the Normandy beaches were home to a threatened species of aquatic fruit bat then every NGO from Greenpeace to the WWF would be up in arms.” It’s now apparent that this assumption is wrong and that the wind turbine comes second to none for climate change activists. This is seen through their quiet attitudes regarding the slaughtering of bird species caused by the wind turbines.

    As California attempts to divorce itself from fossil-fueled electricity, it may be trading one environmental sin for another — although you don’t hear state officials admitting it.

    California’s green energy is growing quickly with wind turbine growing the fastest. As this happens, wildlife experts are warning that this renewable energy source will have a negative impact on the bird species in the area including the numerous protected eagles, owls, and hawks.

    “The cumulative impacts are huge,” said Shawn Smallwood, an expert studying the effects of wind farms on local bird populations. “It is not inconceivable to me that we could reduce golden eagle populations by a great deal, if not wipe them out.”

    There are about 2,500 of these golden eagles in California and the biggest wind turbine farm is said to kill about 80 of these eagles each year, on average. Instead of being concerned about this number, the state is looking to triple their wind turbine capacity in order to generate 33% of its electricity from green energy by 2020.

    “We would like to have no bird deaths and no bird injuries. But, once again, we have to balance all the needs of society. All the people who want to flip their switch and have electricity in their homes,” said Lorelei Oviatt, Kern County planning commissioner.

    In this push for more wind turbine farms, Kern County picked out an area of 225,000 acres slightly north of Los Angeles due to its wind resources. Sadly, this same area is a hunting ground for birds of prey as well as a migratory path for birds that travel from Canada to Mexico with the change of seasons. The correlation between hunting grounds and wind farms seems to be the updrafts that are produced in the areas. This means that birds of prey will most likely be put to the side in favor of wind farms.

    Apparently, the left only cares about the needs of society over the environment when it comes to climate change. One can be sure that if the societal needs had to do with oil rigs, the same people remaining silent on the death of birds would be up in arms against the oil companies.

    “Politics plays a huge role here,” Smallwood said. “Our leaders want this power source so they’re giving, for a time being, a pass to the wind industry. If you or I killed an eagle, we’re looking at major consequences.”

    Smallwood and cohorts are quite shocked that the US Fish and Wildlife Service haven’t taken action against the wind turbines in order to enforce the US Endangered Species Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act.

    “There’s a big, big hypocrisy here,” Sue Hammer of Tehachapi Wildlife Rehab in Kern County said. “If I shoot an eagle, it’s a $10,000 fine and/or a vacation of one to five years in a federal pen of my choice.”

    When similar environmental tragedies happened, like the 2009 Exxon oil spill that killed around 85 birds across five states, they were fined $600,000. Similarly, an Oregon utility company, PacifiCorp, had to pay up $10.5 million when 232 eagles died after power lines were placed in Wyoming. One more instance of companies paying up for harming protected species was in 2005 when a fish hatchery owner had to pay $65,000 and spend six months in a federally-run halfway house after shooting an eagle for feeding out of his business’s hatchery.

    Despite these cases of companies and individuals being held responsible for harming wildlife, the USFWS has yet to punish any wind turbine company for their role in the deaths of protected bird species.

    This is obvious hypocrisy and shows everyone that wind farms are above the law and that anything that shows them in a negative light should be downplayed or simply ignored. This hypocrisy has always been a cornerstone of Al Gore’s climate change rhetoric. Simply put, “Don’t do as I do, do as I say.”

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    • post22

    [ A white-tailed golden eagle killed by a wind turbine in Norway. ]

    How Long Before the Golden Eagle Goes Extinct Because of Wind Turbines?

    The wind turbine symbol of all that is good, renewable, green and politically correct is in reality an environmental holocaust for countries, such as China, that manufacture wind turbine parts, a subsidised failure at reliable electricity generation globally, they blight the lives of people forced to live within their shadow and they kill birds in huge numbers.

    The wind turbine symbol of all that is good, renewable, green and politically correct is in reality an environmental holocaust for countries, such as China, that manufacture wind turbine parts, a subsidised failure at reliable electricity generation globally, they blight the lives of people forced to live within their shadow and they kill birds in huge numbers.

    Yesterday Aardvark blogged about the desecration of the D Day beaches by bird choppers and finished the post with, “Now if the area around the Normandy beaches were home to a threatened species of aquatic fruit bat then every NGO from Greenpeace to the WWF would be up in arms.” Unfortunately, it seems that Aardvark was wrong because wind turbines are, in fact, one of the most sacred icons in the political church of climatology: “As California attempts to divorce itself from fossil-fueled electricity, it may be trading one environmental sin for another — although you don’t hear state officials admitting it.”

    Wind power is the fastest growing component in the United States’ green energy portfolio, but wildlife advocates say that many proponents for the wind turbines are overlooking a detrimental consequence–dead birds, including many protected species of eagles, hawks and owls.

    “The cumulative impacts are huge,” said Shawn Smallwood, one of only a handful of recognized experts who study the impact wind farms have on migratory birds. “It is not inconceivable to me that we could reduce golden eagle populations by a great deal, if not wipe them out.”

    California is home to roughly 2,500 golden eagles. The state’s largest wind farms kill, on average, more than 80 eagles each year. California is set to triple the number of wind farms in the coming years as it continues in its attempt to become the first state in the nation to generate one-third of its electricity from clean energy sources by 2020.

    “We would like to have no bird deaths and no bird injuries. But, once again, we have to balance all the needs of society,” said Lorelei Oviatt, Kern County planning commissioner. “All the people who want to flip their switch and have electricity in their homes.”

    Kern County officials have identified nearly 225,000 acres north of Los Angeles as a prime wind resource area. Unfortunately, the area’s rolling hills and mountains are also prime hunting grounds for raptors and also a common pit stop for migratory birds traveling between Canada and Mexico. The updrafts enjoyed by birds of prey are ideal for generating wind power.

    Balancing the needs of society against something eco, green and fluffy, but only when Climate Religion is being blindly followed. Imagine the uproar and fuss environmentalists would make if it were “Big Oil” or fracking responsible for changes to that much landscape.

     

    “Politics plays a huge role here,” Smallwood said. “Our leaders want this power source so they’re giving, for the time being, a pass to the wind industry. If you or I killed an eagle, we’re looking at major consequences.”

    Smallwood and other experts say it is almost inconceivable the United States Fish and Wildlife Service hasn’t stepped in, since it is the entity that enforces the U.S. Endangered Species Act, the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

     

    “There’s a big, big hypocrisy here,” Sue Hammer of Tehachapi Wildlife Rehab in Kern County said. “If I shoot an eagle, it’s a $10,000 fine and/or a vacation of one to five years in a federal pen of my choice.”

     

    Her point is not far off from the truth.

    In 2009, Exxon pleaded guilty to causing the deaths of about 85 migratory birds in five states that came into contact with uncovered waste tanks filled with crude oil. Exxon was penalized with a fine for $600,000.

    Similarly, PacifiCorp, an Oregon utility, was ordered to pay $10.5 million in fines, restitution and improvements to their equipment after 232 eagles were killed by colliding with power lines in Wyoming.

    In 2005, the owner of a fish hatchery was ordered to serve six months in a federal halfway house and to pay a $65,000 fine for shooting an eagle that was feeding at his uncovered fish hatchery.

    Wind power in the United States generates 41,400 megawatts of electricity. California represents just a fraction of that total, which suggests that the number of raptor kills is considerably higher nationwide. Shockingly, according to records, USFWS has not prosecuted a single company for violating one of the many statutes protecting threatened and endangered birds.

    As a prophet for the church of climatology, Al Gore forbid that there should ever be anything negative published about the planet-saving bird chopper. Prosecuting a company that distributes electricity and has birds fly in to its power lines is certainly frowned upon, and instead should be swept under the rug to avoid the acknowledgment of any violations made by a church of climatology-approved energy generation facility. Hypocrisy has always been the cornerstone of Al Gore’s religion where the rest of us lesser-beings are told how to live our lives by the self-appointed guardians of the planet. The mantra we are supposed to follow is “Do as I say, not as I do.”

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